CMADP brings together junior and senior faculty from the physical, biological, and pharmaceutical sciences at the University of Kansas to produce a multidisciplinary center focused on developing and implementing cutting edge technologies for elucidating the genetic, chemical, and physical mechanisms of disease processes. The scientific emphasis of the Center is on the creation and implementation of enabling technologies that can be employed to identifying new therapeutic targets. This includes state of the art methods for gene sequencing, the genetic manipulation of model organisms, custom fluorescent molecular probes for monitoring physiological processes in model organisms, and microfluidic systems for manipulation and monitoring of biochemical pathways.


The center exploits the strengths of KU and associated universities in the areas of genetics, bioanalytical chemistry and synthesis. The PI, Dr. Susan Lunte is an expert in bioanalytical sensors and the application of microfluidics to bioanalysis. Co-Investigator, Dr. Blake Peterson, develops novel fluorescent probes for monitoring and controlling the transport of drugs across barriers. The third co-PI, Dr. Lundquist, is developing genetic models for neurological diseases. The PI and the co-PIs are all committed to mentoring young faculty who are interested in studying the genetic, biochemical, or physical causes of disease.

target discovery figure

The focus of this Center is on the development and implementation of new enabling technologies for the study of biological pathways and processes related to disease. The three core laboratories help facilitate this process. The figure above shows the flow chart for target discovery in the Center. By utilizing the Center Cores, junior scientists are able to translate biochemical or physical findings regarding a disease pathway to identify potential therapeutic targets. A variety of diseases are investigated including neurological disorders, cancer and cardiovascular disease.


Recent News

November 2018
R. Mark Wightman to give inaugural Ralph N. Adams Lecture at KU

October 2018
New assistant professor of bioanalytical chemistry at KU will also be affiliated with COBRE CMADP

June 2018
Mei He's review article selected for journal cover of Lab on a Chip

View all news ┬╗

Upcoming Events

Ralph N. Adams Lectureship, KU Chemistry Dept.

R. Mark Wightman, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Public Lecture "Detecting Catecholamines--A Journey from Beaker to the Behaving Brain"
Thursday, November 15 @ 4:00pm
Integrated Science Building, Room 1154 (Central District)
Reception immediately following lecture in ISB atrium, open to all

Scientific Lecture "Chemical Monitoring of Neurotransmission with Microelectrodes"
Friday, November 16 @ 4:00pm
Integrated Science Building, Room 1154 (Central District)

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