Advisory Boards

External Advisory Board

An EAB of eminent scholars representing basic, translational and clinical neurosciences has been created and the composition of this Board is shown below. The EAB meets twice a year, once by teleconference and the second as a face-to-face meeting at the University of Kansas. During the latter meeting, members review the structure, function and scientific accomplishments of the program sponsored by CMADP. They attend presentations made by the CMADP-supported scientists and Core leaders, and they make recommendations to the PI and Co-Is on the quality of progress being made by the CMADP program. Members of the EAB also meet individually with the Project Investigators to assess the quality of their experiences in terms of mentoring and the operations of the Core facilities, as well as to discuss the scientific accomplishments in their respective projects and their future plans. The EAB also reviews and approves funding recommendations for new Research and Pilot Project awards by the CMADP.

The advice and recommendations offered by the EAB are recorded, considered and followed by the PI and Co-Is, including recommendations to change the funding of Investigator projects, to alter the training components of the CMADP, or to alter the function and organization of the Cores. The PI and Co-Is discuss such recommendations with the Investigators and their mentors in the CMADP, and/or with the Directors of the various Cores and their Steering Committees, in order to develop appropriate plans to deal with the recommended changes. Key criteria and milestones are developed together with the Investigators and Directors to assess performance and accomplishment of goals suggested by the EAB. The PI and Co-Is consult frequently with the EAB and IAC during the execution of any substantive programmatic changes and update both the EAB and IAC about progress and outcomes resulting from the recommended changes. These changes are also discussed at the next scheduled EAB and IAC meeting.

James Landers photoJames Landers
Commonwealth Professor in Chemistry, Mechanical Engineering and Pathology
University of Virginia

434-243-8658


Carol Saunders photoCarol Saunders
PhD, FACMG, Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, Children's Mercy Hospital
Director, Molecular Genetics Laboratory
Associate Professor, Department of Pathology, UMKC School of Medicine

816-234-3588


Bradley Smith photoBradley Smith
Emil T. Hofman Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry
University of Notre Dame

574-631-8632


Recent News

February 2017
CMADP Project Investigators co-author Top Downloaded article in Lab on a Chip

CMADP Co-I awarded R01 from NIH National Cancer Institute

CMADP Graduate's research featured on cover of Genetics and in other journals

October 2016
CMADP Co-I receives Mathers Foundation grant

View all news »

Upcoming Events
Special seminar by Dr. James P. Landers
Commonwealth Professor in Chemistry,
Mechanical Engineering & Pathology
University of Virginia

Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 3:00pm
Simons Auditorium, HBC, West Campus

"Integrated Microfluidic Systems for Forensic DNA Analysis"
In 2006, we demonstrated that microfluidic technology could provide a ‘lab-on-a-chip’ solution for real-world genetic analysis. Sample-in/answer-out functionality was shown for the detection of bacteria in mouse blood and in a human nasal swab, with a sub-30 minute analytical time for DNA extraction, amplification, electrophoretic separation and detection. We extrapolated these technology developments to the analysis of short tandem repeats (STR) in human DNA; these clinically-insignificant (presumably) tetranucleotide sequences function effectively for statistically-relevant matching in human identification. Our efforts led to the development of a commercializable system designed for implementation in crime labs for STR profiling convicted felons or, in some states, profiling arrestees in booking stations. An intricate but functional microfluidic architecture allowed sample-to-profile to be achieved from a cheek swab in less than 80 minutes, using nanoliter flow control, infrared thermocycling and rapid electrophoretic separation of DNA with 5-color fluorescence detection. We have since demonstrated the fabrication of hybrid microdevices composed of inexpensive polymeric materials, many of these commercial-off-the-shelf. We have designed, built and functionalized fully-integrated DNA analysis chemistry/microfluidics on a rotationally-driven system the size of a compact disc. With this system, DNA can be extracted from a swab, PCR amplified to generate an abundance of DNA fragments of the STR loci, followed by resolution of those fragments in a separation in a 4 cm Leff channel that is complete in <300 sec with a 2-base resolution. The processes that allow for swab in–profile out microfluidics are carried out on an instrument that can be carried in one hand and weighs ~14 lbs, ultimately allowing for facile rapid human identification/screening in the field.
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